Web lists-archives.com

What's so special about objects/17/ ?




In 2007 Junio wrote
(https://public-inbox.org/git/7vr6lcj2zi.fsf@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx/):

    +static int need_to_gc(void)
    +{
    +	/*
    +	 * Quickly check if a "gc" is needed, by estimating how
    +	 * many loose objects there are.  Because SHA-1 is evenly
    +	 * distributed, we can check only one and get a reasonable
    +	 * estimate.
    +	 */
    +	char path[PATH_MAX];
    +	const char *objdir = get_object_directory();
    +	DIR *dir;
    +	struct dirent *ent;
    +	int auto_threshold;
    +	int num_loose = 0;
    +	int needed = 0;
    +
    +	if (sizeof(path) <= snprintf(path, sizeof(path), "%s/17", objdir)) {
    +		warning("insanely long object directory %.*s", 50, objdir);
    +		return 0;
    +	}
    +	dir = opendir(path);
    +	if (!dir)
    +		return 0;
    +
    +	auto_threshold = (gc_auto_threshold + 255) / 256;
    +	while ((ent = readdir(dir)) != NULL) {
    +		if (strspn(ent->d_name, "0123456789abcdef") != 38 ||
    +		    ent->d_name[38] != '\0')
    +			continue;
    +		if (++num_loose > auto_threshold) {
    +			needed = 1;
    +			break;
    +		}
    +	}

A couple of questions about this patch, which is in git.git as
2c3c439947 ("Implement git gc --auto", 2007-09-05)

1. We still have this check of objects/17/ in builtin/gc.c today. Why
   objects/17/ and not e.g. objects/00/ to go with other 000* magic such
   as the 0000000000000000000000000000000000000000 SHA-1?  Statistically
   it doesn't matter, but 17 seems like an odd thing to pick at random
   out of 00..ff, does it have any significance?

2. It seems overly paranoid to be checking that the files in
  .git/objects/17/ look like a SHA-1. If we have stuff not generated by
  git in .git/objects/??/ we probably have bigger problems than
  prematurely triggering auto gc, can this just be removed as
  redundant. Was this some check e.g. expecting that this would need to
  deal with tempfiles in these directories that we created at the time
  (but no longer do?)?