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Re: is there a stylistic preference for a trailing "--" on a command?




On Fri, Nov 10, 2017 at 10:12:39AM -0800, Stefan Beller wrote:

> On Fri, Nov 10, 2017 at 5:57 AM, Robert P. J. Day <rpjday@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
> >
> >   just noticed these examples in "man git-bisect":
> >
> > EXAMPLES
> >   $ git bisect start HEAD v1.2 --      # HEAD is bad, v1.2 is good
> >   ...
> >   $ git bisect start HEAD origin --    # HEAD is bad, origin is good
> >   ...
> >   $ git bisect start HEAD HEAD~10 --   # culprit is among the last 10
> >
> > is there some rationale or stylistic significance to those trailing
> > "--" on those commands? i assume they have no effect, just curious as
> > to why they're there.
> 
> By having the -- there, it is clear that the strings are ref specs and not files
> of such a name. (Who would want to store a file named HEAD~10 in their
> repo?)

Just to be explicit, that makes it not just clear to the user but clear
to Git. Without a "--" there heuristics that kick in. The first section
of the "gitcli" manpage talks about this, though I don't know that we
explicitly document the heuristics anywhere (and I think that is
intentional -- we promise only to try to do what you meant, and scripts
that want exact behavior should use a disambiguating "--").

-Peff