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Re: [PATCH 3/3] grep: recurse in-process using 'struct repository'




Hi,

Brandon Williams wrote:

> Convert grep to use 'struct repository' which enables recursing into
> submodules to be handled in-process.

\o/

This will be even nicer with the changes described at
https://public-inbox.org/git/20170706202739.6056-1-sbeller@xxxxxxxxxx/.
Until then, I fear it will cause a regression --- see (*) below.

[...]
>  Documentation/git-grep.txt |   7 -
>  builtin/grep.c             | 390 +++++++++------------------------------------
>  cache.h                    |   1 -
>  git.c                      |   2 +-
>  grep.c                     |  13 --
>  grep.h                     |   1 -
>  setup.c                    |  12 +-
>  7 files changed, 81 insertions(+), 345 deletions(-)

Yay, tests still pass.

[..]
> --- a/Documentation/git-grep.txt
> +++ b/Documentation/git-grep.txt
> @@ -95,13 +95,6 @@ OPTIONS
>  	<tree> option the prefix of all submodule output will be the name of
>  	the parent project's <tree> object.
>  
> ---parent-basename <basename>::
> -	For internal use only.  In order to produce uniform output with the
> -	--recurse-submodules option, this option can be used to provide the
> -	basename of a parent's <tree> object to a submodule so the submodule
> -	can prefix its output with the parent's name rather than the SHA1 of
> -	the submodule.

Being able to get rid of this is a very nice change.

[...]
> +++ b/builtin/grep.c
[...]
> @@ -366,14 +349,10 @@ static int grep_file(struct grep_opt *opt, const char *filename)
>  {
>  	struct strbuf buf = STRBUF_INIT;
>  
> -	if (super_prefix)
> -		strbuf_addstr(&buf, super_prefix);
> -	strbuf_addstr(&buf, filename);
> -
>  	if (opt->relative && opt->prefix_length) {
> -		char *name = strbuf_detach(&buf, NULL);
> -		quote_path_relative(name, opt->prefix, &buf);
> -		free(name);
> +		quote_path_relative(filename, opt->prefix, &buf);
> +	} else {
> +		strbuf_addstr(&buf, filename);
>  	}

style micronit: can avoid these braces since both branches are
single-line.

[...]
> @@ -421,284 +400,80 @@ static void run_pager(struct grep_opt *opt, const char *prefix)
>  		exit(status);
>  }
>  
> -static void compile_submodule_options(const struct grep_opt *opt,
> -				      const char **argv,
> -				      int cached, int untracked,
> -				      int opt_exclude, int use_index,
> -				      int pattern_type_arg)
> -{
[...]
> -	/*
> -	 * Limit number of threads for child process to use.
> -	 * This is to prevent potential fork-bomb behavior of git-grep as each
> -	 * submodule process has its own thread pool.
> -	 */
> -	argv_array_pushf(&submodule_options, "--threads=%d",
> -			 (num_threads + 1) / 2);

Being able to get rid of this is another very nice change.

[...]
> +	/* add objects to alternates */
> +	add_to_alternates_memory(submodule.objectdir);

(*) This sets up a single in-memory object store with all the
processed submodules.  Processed objects are never freed.
This means that if I run a command like

	git grep --recurse-submodules -e neverfound HEAD

in a project with many submodules then memory consumption scales in
the same way as if the project were all one repository.  By contrast,
without this patch, git is able to take advantage of the implicit
free() when each child exits to limit its memory usage.

Worse, this increases the number of pack files git has to pay
attention to the sum of the numbers of pack files in all the
repositories processed so far.  A single object lookup can take
O(number of packs * log(number of objects in each pack)) time.  That
means performance is likely to suffer as the number of submodules
increases (n^2 performance) even on systems with a lot of memory.

Once the object store is part of the repository struct and freeable,
those problems go away and this patch becomes a no-brainer.

What should happen until then?  Should this go in "next" so we can get
experience with it but with care not to let it graduate to "master"?

Aside from those two concerns, this patch looks very good from a quick
skim, though I haven't reviewed it closely line-by-line.  Once we know
how to go forward, I'm happy to look at it again.

Thanks,
Jonathan