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Bug - Dirty submodule differences between OSX/Ubuntu




Referencing: https://gitlab.com/python-mode-devs/python-mode/issues/36

I reported a bug because when adding the python-mode repo as a
submodule in my project, it shows as "dirty".

The maintainers of that module reported back that my bug cannot be reproduced.

I upgraded my local install to 2.13.2 on OSX El Capitan.

I tried to re-create the issue, and did so successfully.

I created a docker container using ubuntu:latest as the base,
installed git and tried to recreate the issue.

git on ubuntu does not show the submodule as dirty.

I upgraded ubuntu's git to 2.13.2 and git still does not show the
submodule as dirty.

Here is how to reproduce this problem:

mkdir test
cd test
git init
git submodule add https://gitlab.com/python-mode-devs/python-mode.git
python-mode.el
git commit -m 'initial commit'
git status

On ubuntu:
On branch master
nothing to commit, working tree clean

On OSX:
On branch master
Changes not staged for commit:
  (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
  (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
  (commit or discard the untracked or modified content in submodules)

    modified:   python-mode.el (modified content)

no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

---
change into the submodule directory and run status
cd python-mode.el
git status

On ubuntu:
On branch master
Your branch is up-to-date with 'origin/master'.
nothing to commit, working directory clean

On OSX:
On branch master
Your branch is up-to-date with 'origin/master'.
Changes not staged for commit:
  (use "git add/rm <file>..." to update what will be committed)
  (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)

    deleted:    EXTENSIONS

no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

---
This is a bug because the upstream repo maintainers cannot fix the
problem if they cannot see it.  dirty/clean reporting  should be the
consistent across all operating systems.