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Re: Interpreting package version number




	Hi.

On Wed, Jan 16, 2019 at 10:46:58AM -0500, Roberto C. Sánchez wrote:
> On Wed, Jan 16, 2019 at 08:51:27AM -0600, Richard Owlett wrote:
> > On 01/16/2019 07:58 AM, songbird wrote:
> > > Richard Owlett wrote:
> > > 
> > > > I'm running Stretch and have just installed Tcl from repository.
> > > > Synaptic reports the installed version is 8.6.6+dfsg-1+b1 .
> > > > The current upstream version is 8.6.9 .
> > > > 
> > > > I don't understand what "+dfsg-1+b1" is telling me.
> > > > Where is that numbering scheme described?
> > > > 
> > > > My goal is to understand (from upstream docs) how what I have installed
> > > > differs from the current upstream version.
> > > 
> > >    if you want to know what is different in any
> > > debian package you can download the source code
> > > package and look at the patches it applies.
> > > 
> > 
> > IIUC "dfsg" tells me that Debian chose a different means to the same
> > functional end (User's POV) than how upstream accomplished it.
> > 
> Sort of.  The reason for a "dfsg" repack of the upstream source is
> usually to remove some components that may not be permitted to
> distribute.  These might include binary blobs which cannot be generated
> from source, non-free documentation (some protocol libraries include
> copies of the RFCs they implement and those RFCs are sometimes not
> freely redistributable).
> 
> I have yet to encounter a "dfsg" repack that changes the functionality
> of the package, though.

dfsg repack of snmpd, for instance. Running the thing without upstream
MiBs is a pain. Yes, they provide a way to get those MiBs, but still.

Reco