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Re: Correct: System Thinks Hardware Clock is UTC




On Sat, 19 May 2018 10:37:39 +1000 Ben Finney <bignose@xxxxxxxxxx>
wrote:

> Patrick Bartek <nemommxiv@xxxxxxxxx> writes:
> 
> > I could use hwclock --set --date=<yadda yadda> with the --localtime
> > option, etc., to correct this but is there an easier way?
> 
> There is only one clock involved in this: the hardware clock.
> 
> By telling the operating system that your hardware clock is set to
> UTC, you have told the operating system how to *render* the hardware
> clock's time for your local time zone.
> 
> Setting the clock will set the hardware clock. By using a “set the
> clock” tool, you will set the hardware clock — but the clock-setting
> tool will take care of converting the time zone correctly.
>
> I think the generally-applicable advice is correct: tell the OS that
> your clock is set to UTC, and leave it to the operating system to
> figure out the weirdness of time zones.

Actually, the hardware clock has always been set to local time.  Had
to: Used to have Windows XP installed (this box is 11+ years old) as a
multi-boot with Linux, and as you know Windows needs the hardware
clock set to local to work correctly.  I've just keep it that way. .  

> So I think you've done the right thing: tell the OS to keep the
> hardware clock at UTC. Now you just need to tell it what the time
> is :-)

Actually, it's the other way around. hardware clock is local time, but
Stretch thinks it's UTC. (I have Wheezy on here to, but it's configured
correctly.)

Just going to use hwclock and the --localtime option to reset it.
Haven't been able to find any other way to do so.

> Assuming your machine is internet-connected, tell the operating system
> to keep your hardware clock in sync with the Network Time Protocol, by
> installing an NTP server. I can't recall what the default is; I use
> the ‘chrony’ package.

I alway install ntp, but I want everything timewise configured
appropriately before I do so.

Thanks for you advice.

B