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Re: libgparted bug.




On Sun 11 Feb 2018 at 00:01:26 (-0500), Gene Heskett wrote:
> On Saturday 10 February 2018 23:34:12 David Wright wrote:
> 
> > On Sat 10 Feb 2018 at 22:06:05 (-0500), Gene Heskett wrote:
> > > On Saturday 10 February 2018 18:04:30 Brian wrote:
> > > > On Sat 10 Feb 2018 at 16:09:00 -0500, Gene Heskett wrote:
> > > > > On Saturday 10 February 2018 15:27:09 David Wright wrote:
> > > > > > On Sat 10 Feb 2018 at 15:08:58 (-0500), Gene Heskett wrote:
> > > > > > > On Saturday 10 February 2018 11:57:38 David Wright wrote:
> > > > > > > > On Sat 10 Feb 2018 at 09:10:40 (-0500), Gene Heskett wrote:
> > > > > > > > > And despite my emasculation of udev, disabling sdd,
> > > > > > > > > according to the syslog, usbmount is still auto mounting
> > > > > > > > > these cards, all 3 of them.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > You wrote:    ↑↑↑↑↑↑↑↑

This line is very lonely, having been torn from its referent.

> > > > > >
> > > > > > > > > So if I plan on working with these images on this
> > > > > > > > > machine with gparted, I imagine I had better find
> > > > > > > > > usbmount and remove its execute bits. But first make my
> > > > > > > > > baby some breakfast.
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > >  Oh my, what did you expect?
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > For something as potentially obnoxious as that, an easily
> > > > > > > thrown switch to enable/disable it. It is NOT in
> > > > > > > /etc/init.d.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > What isn't in /etc/init.d? What do you expect to be in
> > > > > > /etc/init.d?
> > > > >
> > > > > usbmount.  I expected to find a starter script with a
> > > > > recognizable name.
> > > >
> > > > Your expectations on where usbmount puts its files are completely
> > > > and utterly unfounded.
> > > >
> > > > > > Why?
> > > > >
> > > > > Why not? At least that would give this hacker a target to throw
> > > > > a hatchet at.
> > > >
> > > > David Wright meant - why did you expect usbmount (which you have
> > > > determined is not on your machine) to put a file in /etc/init.d?
> > > >
> > > > > > > >  Package: usbmount
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > >  Description-en: automatically mount and unmount USB mass
> > > > > > > > storage devices
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > >  This package automatically mounts USB mass storage
> > > > > > > > devices (typically USB pens) when they are plugged in, and
> > > > > > > > unmounts them when they are removed. The mountpoints
> > > > > > > > (/media/usb[0-7] by default), filesystem types to
> > > > > > > > consider, and mount options are configurable. When
> > > > > > > > multiple devices are plugged in, the first available
> > > > > > > > mountpoint is automatically selected. If the device
> > > > > > > > provides a model name, a symbolic link
> > > > > > > > /var/run/usbmount/MODELNAME pointing to the mountpoint is
> > > > > > > > automatically created.
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > Cheers,
> > > > > > > > David.
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > No such critter on this wheezy box.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > So how do you explain the above? This is getting silly.
> > > > >
> > > > > Silly? Not in the least. At least I don't often equate silly
> > > > > with frustrating. Something is starting this "usbmount" thingy,
> > > > > and its not me.
> > > >
> > > > This is the "usbmount" thingy critter which is absent from your
> > > > box?
> > > >
> > > > > sudo grep -R usbmount /etc/*
> > > > > has been peeking under the covers in etc for around 5 minutes
> > > > > now, no hits.
> > > >
> > > > Not surprising if it doesn't exist.
> > >
> > > I didn't think it did, until htop caught it running yesterday.
> > >
> > > > > So in this admittedly corner case, the thing needs an on/off
> > > > > switch so gparted CAN do its thing without fighting with what
> > > > > somebody no doubt thought was one of their better brainstorms.
> > > > > Its turned what should be a simple operation on working 64GiB 
> > > > > disk, whose last data is just past 4GiB, and I want to then make
> > > > > another image file that only includes the used area of the disk,
> > > > > into a major PAIN IN THE ASS. This is how raspbian and ayufan
> > > > > prepare the images they release, so why the hell can't I do it
> > > > > too?
> > > > >
> > > > > Grep finally found it, and it does have a switch, so for now its
> > > > > turned off on this machine. Hopefully that will also stop the
> > > > > cell phone icons from showing up when I plug it in for charging.
> > > >
> > > > Where did it find it?
> > >
> > > /etc/usbmount/usbmount.conf.  And it has exactly the switch I was
> > > looking for. So ATM its turned off. But damn! I just now plugged in
> > > the cell phone and the icon popped up in about a second. But I guess
> > > thats because I didn't block it for sdf.
> >
> > Odd, that, because the README for usbmount says:
> >
> >  USBmount is intended as a lightweight solution which is independent
> > of a desktop environment. Users which would like an icon to appear
> > when an USB device is plugged in should use other alternatives.
> >
> I don't believe usbmount did this one, 60-persistent-storage.rule I think 
> did this one as I only kill sdd, and the phone, if the card reader (sdd) 
> is plugged in would have made the phone be sdf.
> 
> Just so we're on the same page, David. :)

Well I'd be interested to know which line in 60-persistent-storage.rules
does anything much, other than juggle with names etc in its realm: /dev.
I think it's more likely that some other subsystem is watching out for
what udev does, and then acting on the information that it returns.
There's also the possibility that something has inserted a >60 rule
(99?) into /{etc,lib}/udev/. Otherwise, look to your DE configuration.

The problem with your messing about in udev's rules is that you don't
know what other subsystems are relying on its efficacy.

Cheers,
David.