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Re: Causes, cures and prevention of orphaned inodes?




On Mon, 2018-02-05 at 08:03 +0900, Mark Fletcher wrote:
> On Sun, Feb 04, 2018 at 03:49:36PM -0500, Stephen P. Molnar wrote:
> > I am running Debian Stretch on am eight thread AMD GPU platform.
> > Lately, it seems if I have been plagued by surfeit of orphaned
> > nodes.
> > 
> > I have goggled the causes. cures and prevention, but have gotten no
> > results that make any sense to me. I've been using computer since
> > the
> > early 1960's but am an organic chemist by training and experience,
> > not
> > a hardware expert.
> > 
> 
> The problem may not be hardware. From reading the details you
> provided, 
> it looks like you are using ext4 filesystems on your disks. Is that 
> correct? We occasionally get people on here reporting problems with
> more 
> esoteric / exotic file systems (cue the cries of protest from
> various 
> corners that super-duper-dijeridoo-fs isn't exotic, and that I'm a 
> dinosaur) but ext4 is in very wide use and as far as I know, stable.
> 
> Anyway worth confirming what filesystem(s) is/are actually on the
> disks 
> where orphaned inodes are occurring. If it is something more
> unusual, 
> you might have found a bug in the filesystem. Also, do you use 
> encryption on your disks eg LUKS?
> 
> Just a couple of thoughts
> 
> Mark.


I appreciate your suggestion.

Here are the results of blkid:

Installed drives:
root@AbNormal:/home/comp# blkid
/dev/sda1: UUID="8fa0b985-70ca-4d3e-a448-1a419d8b078b" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="b5226506-01"
/dev/sda5: UUID="3d0d7ebe-26f4-4f0e-be01-dca7ce9c9132" TYPE="swap" PARTUUID="b5226506-05"
/dev/sdb1: UUID="d65867da-c658-4e35-928c-9dd2d6dd5742" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="0003d403-01"
/dev/sdb2: UUID="007c1f16-34a4-438c-9d15-e3df601649ba" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="0003d403-02"

External USB Thumb drive:
root@AbNormal:/home/comp# blkid
/dev/sda1: UUID="8fa0b985-70ca-4d3e-a448-1a419d8b078b" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="b5226506-01"
/dev/sda5: UUID="3d0d7ebe-26f4-4f0e-be01-dca7ce9c9132" TYPE="swap" PARTUUID="b5226506-05"
/dev/sdb1: UUID="d65867da-c658-4e35-928c-9dd2d6dd5742" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="0003d403-01"
/dev/sdb2: UUID="007c1f16-34a4-438c-9d15-e3df601649ba" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="0003d403-02"
/dev/sdc1: UUID="28C1-0F73" TYPE="vfat"

External Backup drive:
root@AbNormal:/home/comp# blkid
/dev/sda1: UUID="8fa0b985-70ca-4d3e-a448-1a419d8b078b" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="b5226506-01"
/dev/sda5: UUID="3d0d7ebe-26f4-4f0e-be01-dca7ce9c9132" TYPE="swap" PARTUUID="b5226506-05"
/dev/sdb1: UUID="d65867da-c658-4e35-928c-9dd2d6dd5742" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="0003d403-01"
/dev/sdb2: UUID="007c1f16-34a4-438c-9d15-e3df601649ba" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="0003d403-02"
/dev/sdc1: LABEL="Seagate Expansion Drive" UUID="F0DAF608DAF5CABC" TYPE="ntfs" PARTUUID="6cccaf93-01"

However, I usually gt et the orphaned inodes where there are no exteranl drives mounted.

-- 
Stephen P. Molnar, Ph.D.
Consultant
www.molecular-modeling.net
(614)312-7528 (c)
Skype: smolnar1