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Re: [SOLVED] Re: Cannot connect to WiFi




On Fri 17 Nov 2017 at 02:35:22 (+0000), Juan R. de Silva wrote:
> On Thu, 16 Nov 2017 16:56:39 -0600, David Wright wrote:
> 
> > On Thu 16 Nov 2017 at 20:11:18 (+0000), Juan R. de Silva wrote:
> >> 
> >> On Wed, 15 Nov 2017 19:48:00 +0000, Juan R. de Silva wrote:
> >> 
> >> > Hi folks,
> >> > 
> >> > My ISP replaced my old modem with the new one. I changed my WiFi
> >> > Authentication key and the name of the WiFi network. Then I made
> >> > Network Manager to "forget" my old WiFi. Network Manager finds my new
> >> > WiFi but I cannot connect to it.
> >> > 
> >> > When "Authentication Key is required" dialog pops up and the key is
> >> > entered,j Connect button remains grayed out/disabled. Thus there is
> >> > no way to get through but pressing Cancel button.
> >> > 
> >> > I'm running Debian Stretch.
> >> > 
> >> > Could somebody help. It's quite urgent now.
> >> 
> >> 
> >> The problem is solved. It was Bob Weber post that led me to solution,
> >> though the problem was a kind of different.
> >> 
> >> Here what I mean. Just by looking at my password, as entered into NM, I
> >> did not find any weird characters or trailing spaces in it. A typo was
> >> exclued since I copy-pasted it from my password manager storage. I was
> >> in loss and just for no reason, when in GNOME "Authentication required"
> >> dialog pressed Backspace once... All at a sudden I get through and
> >> connected!..
> >> 
> >> Then I copied the password I uncessfully tried to use in Network
> >> Manager and pasted it bellow a password copied from my modem/router (or
> >> as David rightfully called it "gateway" device).
> >> 
> >> That was it. The original password was 64 characters and the one in my
> >> modem was only 63 characters. Aparantly the modem has a limitation on
> >> the password length,
> > 
> > The protocol sets the limits, not the router.
> 
> I agree. But I've meant quite a different thing. 
> 
> Whoever or whatever sets the limit, if the user makes a mistake and 
> enters into appropriate router field oversized password, it is a 
> responsibility of a good programmer to let the user know that the 
> password is going to be truncated. 
> 
> A user has a right to make a mistake, not have enough knowledge, even to 
> be dumb at the end. A good GUI programmer is expected to oversee such 
> things.
> 
> Silently truncating an entry IS a silly programming technic.

My intention was not to question your judgement on your experience,
but only to explain the significance of the strings you mentioned,
with lengths of 63 and 64. That wasn't apparent from your description
of both as "passwords" when only the shorter one is. Being aware of
the difference might help save the time of some future reader of
this thread.

Cheers,
David.