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Re: Guide(s?) to backup philosophies




On 3/14/17 10:54 AM, Glenn English wrote:

On Mon, Mar 13, 2017 at 12:38 PM, Dan Purgert <dan@xxxxxxxx> wrote:
David Christensen wrote:
On 03/11/2017 07:10 AM, Richard Owlett wrote:
I've vague ideas of what backup pattern(s) I might follow.
I'm looking for reading materials that might trigger "I hadn't thought
of that" moments.

Suggestions?
I didn't see anybody talk about incremental backup (the backup
consists of current versions as well as earlier ones -- often earlier
work can replace erroneous or lost current work. Or work you don't
notice is gone for a few days.). There are 2 I know of, and one (and
probably many more) that may do that:


Adding two:

I've been using rdiff-backup for years - essentially it's time machine for linux. There's a little helper routine called "backup ninja" and a gui (works in a text window) called ninjahelper. It will do incremental backups across two machines, and knows how to set up jobs for mysql, postgress, and the entire file system. It takes a little work to set up (server and client), and it's a bit tricky to do recoveries (command line rdiff-backup commands) - but it does the job very well. It's great of recovering accidentally deleted files, and older versions of files. For full snapshots (e.g., crash recovery), I just use RAIDED disks, mirrored via DRBD to a failover machine.

If you're on a desktop machine, you might consider a cloud backup service. I recommend CrashPlan - there's a linux client, it will back up to other machines (local and remote) for free, and there's a very reliable, and cheap cloud backup (particularly nice pricing for backing up all machines in a household, with unlimited storage).

I use the first approach on our production servers, the second for all the machines at home (mix of Mac, Windows, Linux). My wife and I also run Time Machine on our Macbooks - there's a lot to be said for having backup that doesn't require having an external disk plugged in.

Miles Fidelman


--
In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice.
In practice, there is.  .... Yogi Berra