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Re: apt cron autoclean not enabled by default




David Kalnischkies writes ("Re: apt cron autoclean not enabled by default"):
> Now that you are in the habit of switching tools (SCNR), try "apt"
> instead of "apt-get" which defaults to deleting .deb files after it has
> used them for installation.

Heh.

> On Sun, Oct 08, 2017 at 03:20:04PM +0100, Ian Jackson wrote:
> > I realise we've been arguing for years about turning on _updates_ by
> > default, but I hadn't realised that we doubted whether people would
> > want to delete decades-old .deb files...
> 
> People are different, so, much like you will find people complaining
> about automatic upgrades you will also find people complaining about you
> having deleted files they wanted to share with other machines via
> sneaker nets, needed for that downgrade to unbreak their system, want to
> hold a bit longer on to the files they have paid a heavy fee/time for
> while downloading via mobile/third-internet-world countries or just like
> to run their private partial copy of snapshot.debian.org.

These might be good reasons for not changing the behaviour of
existing installations.  I don't see the reason for the default for
new installations being to keep all .debs forever.

> I guess we (= Debian) will invent something after automatic upgrades are
> done as there is then a "need" for it (assuming those tools don't delete
> already, which I am not sure), much like we will eventually figure out
> how to phase out old kernels (at the moment they are stuck waiting for
> an autoremove to be run, but that can't really be run without user
> confirmation).

Uh.  OK.

> btw: I don't want to be sounding like "that guy", but reading the
> release notes helps preventing "decades-old" as that includes the
> suggestion to run 'clean' before the upgrade and Debian releases a
> few times within a decade… (heck, apt hasn't reached the "decades"
> milestone yet… so technically… but just a few more months).

Hah.

Thanks for your attention.

Ian.