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Re: UMASK 002 or 022?




On Fri, 2017-06-30 at 21:22 +1000, Scott Leggett wrote:
> If windows is different, it looks to be the outlier because macOS
> behaves the same way as Debian[0]:
> 
>   > For example, the default umask of 022 results in permissions of 644
>   > on new files and 755 on new folders. Groups and other users can read
>   > the files and traverse the folders, but only the owner can make
>   > changes.
> 
> [0] https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201684

Windows being an outlier is a recent thing.  Earlier versions behaved
like the rest of us.  Such behaviour originated in a time when computer
users were once Uni students themselves.  They knew what file
permissions were and how to change them, and were smart enough to not
be scared of sharing as the default philosophy.  Unfortunately for gwmf
ms6@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx most Debian developers come from that cohort.

gwmfms6@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx is right in saying today's computer users don't
have the "sharing is what makes us bigger than the sum of the parts"
philosophy.  Where he goes wrong is in assuming they share their
computers.  While there was a time many people shared a single CPU,
today many CPU's share a person.  Or less obliquely, everyone has their
own phone / tablet / laptop, which they don't share with anyone except
US border agents.  In this environment umask is a quaint hallmark of a
bygone time.

The one example he gave of students sharing a University computer is a
furphy.  It's true it still such sharing still happens.  But the person
in charge of the machine isn't some naive first year pleb.  It's a
battle hardened university sysadmin who, god bless his black heart, has
faced down 1000's of aspiring university student training in the art he
long ago mastered. He knows how to wield a umask with power and
precision.  He doesn't whinge about pam_umask not being the default, he
fixes it and while he's at it alters the shell scripts in
/etc/X11/Xsession.d/ gets exactly the umask they deserve.

TL;DR - this complaint is 20 years too late.

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